Anti-Corruption Poster ©

Nick Cavanagh/Nigeria Justice for All Programme

Over recent years, 73% of Nigerians believe corruption has increased (Global Corruption Barometer 2010). Many Nigerians also think that anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) have not met public expectations ('Public Perceptions of Anti-Corruption Agencies', a study by the Convention on Business Integrity, 2008). 

Civil society plays a critical role in confronting corruption, especially in high-profile cases. 

Our work aims to increase public support for, and trust in, ACAs. We also seek to improve the collaboration between civil society organisations, ACAs, media organisations and the public to prevent corruption.

Our aim

  • Increase public support for, and trust in, anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) 
  • Improve the collaboration between civil society organisations, ACAs, media organisations and the public to prevent corruption
  • Reduce the number of public officials involved in corruption and financial crimes
  • Create mechanisms through which ACAs and civil society collaborate in preventing corruption
  • Improve information exchange between ACAs, civil society and media
  • Increase public awareness of activities of ACAs
  • Provide access to quality guidance material and advice on corruption prevention mechanisms

Our approach

  • Training: corruption prevention mechanisms and monitoring and evaluation of anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) by civil society organisations (CSOs)
  • Coordination mechanisms between ACAs, CSOs, the media and the public
  • Lesson learning and replication

Who we work with

  • Anti-Corruption Agencies (ACAs)
  • Independent Corrupt Practices Commission Anti-Corruption and Transparency Units (ICPC ACTUs), located in all government ministries, departments and agencies
  • Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC)
  • Code of Conduct Bureau (CCB)
  • Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU)
  • Special Control Unit on Money Laundering (SCUML) 
  • Other law enforcement and intelligence agencies: National Drug Law Enforcement Agency, State Security Service, Nigeria Police Force
  • Civil Society Organisations

Delivering results

  • Media advocacy training for 43 anti-corruption media practitioners and civil society organisations (CSOs)
  • Independent Corrupt Practices Commission Anti-Corruption and Transparency Units (ICPC ACTUs) developed work plan for increased MDA compliance to ACTU guidelines
  • New ACTU Standing Order and Operating Guidelines adopted by ICPC
  • Supported CSO groups to partner with ICPC to train ACTU heads and Minstries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs)
  • Research on corruption gender impact assessment and gender policy development for anti-corruption agencies commenced
  • The oil revenue tracking social media website recorded a total number of 901,251 accounts, with 1,650 followers and 673 contributors